Our Studies

Our team has undertaken more than 500 studies on behalf of a wide range of clients. This page provides publicly available links to a sample of more than 50 of these reports.

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Evaluation of the Federal Skilled Worker Program

The objectives of the FSWP evaluation were to assess program design and implementation, including timeliness, consistency and transparency of selection; and the impact of the program to date at the immediate and intermediate outcome levels, including a preliminary assessment of the economic establishment of skilled workers, and whether they meet current and long-term labour market needs, while ensuring public safety and confidence in the program. The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the impact of changes made to the selection system for the program in 2002. The work included a detailed literature review on skilled immigrant workers both in Canada and other countries, a document review , interviews with 53 key informants, field visits to 5 Canadian Visa Offices Abroad (CVOA) including London, New Delhi, Hong Kong, Port of Spain, and Buffalo, a statistical analysis of the FOSS and CAIPS databases, an econometric analysis of the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), and surveys of 1,500 FSWs who participated in the FSWP as well as a sample of employers who had participated in the program.

Evaluation of Homelessness Partnering Strategy

The HPS seeks to address homelessness by working in partnership with communities, provinces and territories, other federal departments and the private and not-for-profit sectors. Through its community-based approach, the HPS provides communities with the flexibility and tools to identify and address their own distinct homelessness needs and priorities. HPS funding is invested in local priorities identified by communities thorough a comprehensive community planning process involving a range of local stakeholders. We were engaged to prepare an evaluation framework and conduct an extensive summative evaluation of the HPS.

Evaluation of the Communicable Disease Control and Management Programs

The purpose of the evaluation was to examine the relevance and effectiveness of the Communicable Disease Control and Management (CDCM) Program within the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch for the time period 2008/04 to 2014/03. The evaluation was undertaken in three phases. The primary objective of the first phase was to prepare a detailed evaluation work plan that outlined the specific evaluation issues, indicators, data sources, and methodologies that were to be used. During the second phase, extensive literature, document and database reviews were undertaken and telephone interviews were conducted with a broad cross-section of 41 key representatives including staff from the national office, regional offices, representatives of the Public Health Agency of Canada and national program partners and experts.

Evaluation of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program

The evaluation of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program was designed to assess the continued relevance of the Program, its performance in achieving immediate and intermediate intended outcomes, and its performance in terms of efficiency and economy. To address the complexity of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program, the evaluation used multiple lines of evidence collected through interviews with 110 key informants including policy, program, and field staff from the three administering departments, provincial and territorial government representatives, third party representatives, and other stakeholders; surveys of 2,650 employers, 1,521 temporary foreign workers, and 159 third party representatives involved in the Program; literature review; document, file, and administrative data review; and 12 case studies each focused on a specific evaluation question or research area. The case studies relied on various lines of evidence collected through the evaluation, complemented with an additional 45 interviews with employer and government representatives.

Evaluation of the Aboriginal Skills and Training Strategic Investment Fund (ASTSIF)

The Aboriginal Skills and Training Strategic Investment Fund (ASTSIF) was a $75 million program, introduced in 2009, and targeted at Aboriginal (i.e. First Nations, Inuit and Métis) youth aged 15 to 30 years living either on or off-reserve, including in urban centres. The purpose of this study was to follow-up on program participants to assess the need for and impact of the program. The report presented findings from multiple lines of evidence including: a document, file and literature review, interviews with 103 key informants including 5 HRSDC representatives, 68 project proponents, and 30 key partners involved in ASTSIF projects; development of a new database and participant profiles based on nearly 5,000 participant records submitted by ASTSIF project proponents; a survey of 514 participants in ASTSIF projects; and an analysis of the survey data linked to Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) files as well as Employment Insurance (EI) administrative data.

Summative Evaluation of the Industrial Research & Development Internship Program

The Industrial Research and Development Internship (IRDI) program creates private sector internship opportunities for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. During an internship, students receive a minimum stipend of $10,000 for a placement term of four months to six months. The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the relevance, achievement of expected outcomes, design, implementation, and efficiency and economy of the IRDI program, which provides grants and contributions to private sector companies to engage interns to assist in undertaking innovation and commercialization activities. The lines of evidence employed for the evaluation included document and literature review; review of administrative data on costs and participants; interviews with 52 key informants; surveys of 1,300 participants that included 536 interns, 353 sponsors and 411 supervisors; surveys of 20 prospective interns who applied but were not funded; and 7 focus groups and case studies that focused on achievement of outcomes and delivery. The evaluation results from the different lines of evidence were triangulated and summarized by each evaluation indicator and evaluation issue. Both thematic analysis for qualitative data and statistical analysis were utilized for the quantitative data.

Evaluation of Young Canada Works

The Department of Canadian Heritage (PCH) contributes to the Government of Canada’s Youth Employment Strategy (YES) through the YCW Initiative, created in 1997 to help young Canadians develop work skills and on-the-job experience in sectors aligned with the departmental mandate. The overall objectives of the YCW Initiative are to enhance participants’ knowledge and appreciation of Canada’s achievements and rich cultural heritage; to increase nationally the pool of skilled and qualified candidates for the cultural, heritage, and official language sectors; and to help young Canadians, through practical work experience, to develop their skills, enhance their employability, and learn more about their career options within the culture, heritage, and official language sectors. The objective of the evaluation was to provide comprehensive and reliable evidence on the ongoing relevance and performance (effectiveness, efficiency and economy) of the YCW Initiative. The lines of evidence employed for the evaluation included document and literature review; administrative data review including 10,000 employer exit survey entries and over 11,000 youth exit survey entries; survey of 1,707 of youth who participated in YCW; Survey of 1,029 employers who participated in YCW; and Interviews with 24 key informants. Multiple lines of evidence were triangulated and summarized by each evaluation indicator and evaluation issue.

Evaluation of the National Anti-Drug Strategy

The Strategy is a horizontal initiative of 12 federal departments and agencies, led by the Department of Justice Canada (Justice Canada), with approximately $513.4 million in funding covering activities over five years from 2007/08 to 2011/12. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Strategy, in accordance with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) requirements as set out in the 2009 TBS Directive for Evaluation. The evaluation addressed the relevance and performance (effectiveness, and efficiency and economy) of the Strategy and its three action plans. The scope of the evaluation focused on the period from 2007/08 through to 2010/11.

Evaluation of the Adventure Youth Initiative, St. John’s Newfoundland

The Velocity Adventure Program (Velocity) is an intervention program aimed at reducing anti-social behaviour, increasing attachment to school, and reducing substance abuse and contact with the criminal justice system among youth. The Program works with youth, ages 12 to 19 years, who are at-risk of, or have already been involved in, criminal activities. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the effectiveness of Velocity in reducing the targeted risk factors and examining the implementation, relevance and feasibility of conducting a cost effectiveness of this Program, and to measure the effects of the Program on the participating youth by assessing the extent to which the initiative is being implemented as intended; assessing whether the intended outcomes were achieved, and whether there were any unintended outcomes; providing a descriptive cost analysis for the project; identifying lessons learned, exploring what has worked well, what has not worked well and making recommendations to strengthen the project for the benefit of others interested in implementing or supporting a project of this nature in the future; and assessing the extent to which the project has been adapted to meet the needs of the youth/community.

Aboriginal Courtwork Program Evaluation

This project involved a national evaluation of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program, focusing on its continued relevance, performance, and demonstrated efficiency and economy. The evaluation was a survey of 1,166 clients, interviews with 116 Judicial and Court Officials, a survey of 161 Aboriginal Courtworkers, a document and file review, and key informant interviews with 9 Federal Justice officials, 11 provincial/territorial representatives, and 15 service delivery agency representatives and other stakeholders

Labour Market Information Research for the BC Manufacturing Sector

The specific objectives of the assignment were to develop an inventory of existing Labour Market Information and Intelligence (LMI) specific to the manufacturing sector (North American Industry Classification System - NAICS codes 31 - 33) in BC; undertake a thorough Environmental Scan of the industry; and define the primary occupations and skills identified as in short supply by BC manufacturers. The methodology included a literature review, development of an extensive database of companies active in the BC manufacturing sector, a survey of 557 companies active, and interviews with 18 subject matter experts.

Impact Assessment of the Western Diversification Program's Innovation Component

The purpose of this study was to review WD’s activities related to innovation and prepare a document to inform parties, both within and external to WD, of the roles that the Department plays with respect to promoting innovation in Western Canada, illustrate the types of impacts that result, and identify the characteristics of WD which impact on the organization’s ability to effectively fulfill these roles. We undertook the study in two phases: the purpose of the first phase was to review available information and prepare a detailed work plan that was then implemented in the second phase of the study. In the second phase, developed a profile of the innovation system in Western Canada to establish a context in which to better understand the role of WD, conducted interviews with 66 representatives involved in systemic projects related to innovation that received funding from WD, conducted a survey of a sample of 150 innovation businesses that may be familiar with the innovation-related activities of WD, and conducted interviews with 70 members of the S&T support system who are able to provide an outside objective opinion of the role and impact of WD. We also conducted focus groups and obtained structured input from WD representatives involved in developing and assisting innovation-related projects.

Evaluation of the Community Futures Program

The evaluation included a survey of 512 CFDC clients (309 loan clients and 203 non-loan clients), survey of 79 CFDC representatives (staff and board members of CDFCs), a survey of 73 community partners involved in or affected by the delivery of the CFP, interviews with 12 representatives of FedDev Ontario, telephone interviews with 16 other stakeholders not directly involved in the program, a document and literature review, analysis of administrative data, and 4 case studies (33 representatives provided input and a total of 110 surveys and interviews were included in the analysis).

Evaluation of the Economic Measures Fund

The purpose of this study is to conduct an evaluation of the Economic Measures Fund (EMF). The EMF was established by the BC Ministry of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation (formerly the Treaty Negotiations Office) to build First Nations economic/business development capacity, increase First Nations participation in mainstream economic initiatives and improve the investment climate in BC. The evaluation included interviews with a sample of 41 program representatives involved in the delivery of the EMF including representatives of the Ministry of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation and other ministries, case studies of a stratified sample of 24 projects that received funding from the EMF, and interviews with 90 project proponents involved with the sample of 24 approved projects. The project proponents interviewed include First Nations, contractors and ministry representatives.

Étude d’impact des sous-activités Adoption et commercialisation des technologies et Infrastructure du savoir de la composante Innovation

La raison d’être de ce projet est la réalisation d’une étude d’impact des sous-activités « Adoption et commercialisation des technologies et Infrastructure du savoir de la composante Innovation du Programme de diversification de l’économie de l’Ouest de DEO. L’étude d’impact servira à valider les données contenues dans le système Web de suivi et d’évaluation des projets de DEO, le Portail de projets, et à enrichir ces données grâce à l’examen de renseignements complémentaires obtenus d’autres sources, en vue d’évaluer les extrants et les résultats de chaque investissement, de sous-groupes d’investissements connexes (par exemple ceux effectués dans une grappe, un secteur ou une organisation), et de la totalité des investissements en tant que groupe. L’étude d’impact porte sur un échantillon représentatif de projets approuvés.

Social and Economic Assessment and Analysis of First Nation Communities and Territorial Natural Resources for Integrated Marine Use Planning in the Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area

The purpose of this project was to undertake a social and economic assessment and analysis of First Nation communities and territorial natural resources in the region. The results served as an input into integrated marine use planning in the Pacific North Coast Integrated Management area. The project consisted of two key components: a community survey to collect data which has been used to prepare a demographic profile of First Nations residents along the Central and North Coast; and an assessment of the level of commercial activity based on marine resources including a review of the direct and indirect benefits accruing to First Nation communities. The project also identified factors constraining First Nations participation, trends occurring over time and the opportunities for increasing the benefits to First Nation communities.

Evaluation of the City of Vancouver’s Cultural Grant Programs

The purpose of the evaluation was to evaluate the effectiveness and management of the current cultural grant programs; and make recommendations for improvement which focus on opportunities to better meet the needs of the community; and streamline administration of the programs. We implemented an extensive field research program which included interviews with 11 City of Vancouver staff members involved in the delivery and management of the City’s current cultural grant and support programs as well as the Director of Civic Theatres; a telephone and online survey of representatives from 135 organizations representing 40% of the 341 organizations that received funding from the City’s cultural grant programs; telephone interviews with a sample of 25 individuals and organizations in the arts and cultural sector whose applications have been rejected or who have not applied to the grant and support programs in the past; interviews with 74 other key stakeholders; and two workshop sessions involving over 80 sector representatives to review the major findings of the field research and obtain recommendations on future direction of the grant programs. We also conducted interviews with municipal and provincial organizations involved in administering arts and culture grants in other jurisdictions to identify effective and efficient program design and delivery practices.

Impact Assessment of the Women Enterprise Initiative (WEI)

The Women's Enterprise Initiative (WEI) was established by Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD) in 1994 to encourage the establishment and growth of women-owned and controlled businesses, encourage self-employment and business development, and promote economic equality between men and women. The purpose of this project is to conduct an impact assessment of the WD-funded activities covering the five-year period from April 1, 2003 through March 31, 2008. The major component of the field research involved a survey of a sample of 444 WEI clients drawn from across the four provinces. Other components of the field research included a focus group with clients in each province and interviews with 31 WEI and WD staff, 25 Board Members (current and past), and 30 other stakeholders who work with the target group.

Evaluation of the Women’s Enterprise Initiative (2014)

This evaluation assessed the relevance and performance of the WEI over the five fiscal years from 2008–09 to 2012–13. The evaluation used multiple lines of evidence and included document and literature review, file and database review, analysis of comparable programs, key informant interviews, client surveys and focus groups. During the study period, a total of $25.6 million in loans were approved by the WEI organizations and approximately 17,403 clients received services.

Characteristics of the Labour Market in British Columbia’s Non-Profit Sector

The purpose of this project was to collect, analyze and present labour market information (LMI) related to the non-profit sector (NPS) in British Columbia. A detailed work plan was developed during the first phase of the project which determined what data was required to address each of the research questions, identified key data sources, and outlined the methodologies that would be used to collect the required data. In the second phase, we conducted a review of available labour market information and other data relevant to the NPS including data published by Statistics Canada, Industry Canada, Census Canada, BC Stats and others relevant to the non-profit sector in BC; review of past reports, literature and other documents on major drivers of employment growth in the non-profit sector, the labour market outlook in the short and medium term, current and projected skills shortages, and possible strategies and actions to address skills shortages; compilation of a database of non-profit organizations; a survey of 1464 non-profit organizations active in BC; and interviews were conducted with 30 experts, which represents a response rate of 43%.

Evaluation of the Professional Communication for Internationally Educated Health Professionals Course

The BC Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Innovation (JTI) commissioned an evaluation of the IEHP to determine if the curriculum and delivery of the PC for IEHPs Course achieved its intended objectives and student outcomes in BC and AB; make recommendations for improvements in the curriculum as well as delivery to meet the Course objectives and increase the number of students taking the Course in BC; and compare the curriculum, delivery methods, and outcomes between BC and AB to determine the pros and cons of each version. The methodology included a review of program documents and relevant literature; interviews with key informants; interviews with 10 program representatives associated with the two programs; a survey of 35 course participants; field trips to the colleges delivering the program; and focus groups with stakeholders involved in the program and past Course participants.

MHCC National Mental Health Awards Project Evaluations

The objective of this study was to conduct evaluations of initiatives recognized as part of the 5th Anniversary National Mental Health Awards of the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC). Initiatives that were recognized at the Awards were provided with an evaluation opportunity as part of their Awards package. Five initiatives chose to participate in the evaluation process. The overall purpose of each evaluation was to determine the initiative’s impacts and success, to highlight its innovative approach and design, and to support the initiative’s organization and the MHCC in sharing best practices related to the initiative.

Outcome Evaluation of the British Columbia Settlement and Adaptation Program (BCSAP)

To complete the outcome evaluation, we undertook an extensive field research program which included a detailed review of background information, statistical reports and literature review focused on the apparent reach and need for the Program, interviews with 57 representatives of service delivery agencies, 4 case studies, a survey of 203 BCSAP clients and 16 volunteers, interviews with 20 stakeholders, 3 focus groups with clients, and 2 focus groups with a sample of service delivery representatives.

Formative Evaluation of the Financial Literacy Program

The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) was established to consolidate and strengthen oversight of consumer protection measures in the federally-regulated financial sector, and to expand consumer education and financial literacy activities so that Canadians have the appropriate information and financial skills they need to make informed financial decisions and actively participate in, and strengthen the financial sector. The evaluation utilized multiple lines of evidence including primary as well as secondary data sources. This is the first evaluation of the FCAC Financial Literacy Program and its educational materials, namely The City and Financial Basics. As a formative evaluation, the emphasis was placed on assessment of the relevance, as well as the design and delivery of the Program. The use of a multiple lines of evidence approach served to validate and strengthen findings by cross-referencing a number of sources to explore issues in greater depth. Each key finding and conclusion was triangulated and confirmed from two or more lines of evidence to ensure reliability. Key informant interviews were conducted with a wide range of stakeholders involved in the Program, and surveys were conducted with teachers and students using The City, and facilitators and learners using the Financial Basics.

West Kootenay & Boundary Manufacturing & Technology Industry Survey

The objectives of this project were to prepare an inventory of West Kootenay & Boundary manufacturing and technology businesses; conduct a survey of a sample of these companies and summarize the findings and qualitative data not captured by the inventory database; and provide preliminary analysis and recommendations that could, potentially, lead to the development of strategies to address issues and develop opportunities. To undertake the study, we developed an inventory of businesses in the region, conducted interviews with 209 companies; coded, tabulated and analyzed the data collected; and then used the results to update the company database and prepare a summary report for the West Kootenay/Boundary region.

Developing the Tree Fruit Industry in British Columbia

The tree fruit industry creates significant economic activity in the growing, packing, processing, selling and transporting of tree fruits. In addition, the orchards serve as a major tourism draw by providing a park-like setting for tourists and residents to enjoy. In recent years, the economic health of the industry has become a major concern as BC growers, particularly those in the apple sector, face increasing competition. In response to these conditions, the British Columbia Fruit Growers Association commissioned the development of a strategic plan for the tree fruit industry. The project first identified and assessed key issues that are strategically important to the overall long-term success of the BC tree fruit industry and then developed specific strategies and meaningful actions that industry, government and others can pursue to assist the industry to enhance its competitive position and build a stronger industry future.

Community Assessment of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games and Paralympic Games On Vancouver's Inner-City Neighbourhoods

The purpose of this study was to review potential opportunities and impacts of the 2010 Winter Games on Vancouver’s inner-city neighbourhoods and to identify possible strategies for realizing opportunities and avoiding or mitigating impacts. The focus of the strategies was not limited to actions that could be taken by the Bid Corporation or the three levels of Government. This Community Assessment was done under the auspices of the Vancouver Agreement in cooperation with the Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation.

Évaluation du Programme des travailleurs qualifiés (fédéral)

L’évaluation du Programme des travailleurs qualifiés (fédéral) [PTQF], qui s’est appuyée sur une série de thèmes et de questions concernant la pertinence, la conception, la mise en œuvre et les résultats du Programme, couvre la période de 2002 à 2008, soit la période comprise entre l’entrée en vigueur de la Loi sur l’immigration et la protection des réfugiés (LIPR) et de son règlement d’application, et la mise en œuvre des instructions ministérielles (en 2008). L’évaluation visait plus précisément à verifier la conception et la mise en œuvre du Programme, y compris l’efficacité, l’uniformité et la transparence du processus de sélection; et les retombées du Programme à ce jour par rapport aux niveaux de résultats immédiats et intermédiaires, y compris l’établissement économique des travailleurs qualifiés.

Regional Economic Impact Assessment and Strategy for Arts, Culture & Heritage: Sea to Sky Corridor, From Lions Bay to the Pemberton Valley

While the Sea to Sky Corridor is home to a diverse range of artists and artisans, attractions and cultural festivals/events, no economic impact study has ever been undertaken of the arts, culture and heritage sector. As such, the purpose of this study was to identify the economic benefits of arts, culture and heritage activities in the Sea to Sky Corridor, from Lions Bay to the Pemberton Valley; and recommend strategies for enhancing those benefits in the future. We conducted the study in three phases. The primary objective of the first phase was to prepare a detailed work plan which was then implemented in the second phase. The second phase included development of an extensive population list of sector participants and interviews with 202 artists and artisans, 57 staff members of 45 arts, culture and heritage organizations, and 55 stakeholders involved in the arts, culture and heritage sector. In the third phase, we conducted a series of community workshops (in Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton) and developed recommendations to strengthen the arts, culture and heritage sector in the region.

Socio-Economic Impact Assessment of the Mountain Pine Beetle

British Columbia experienced the largest mountain pine beetle (MPB) outbreak ever recorded. The economic consequences of the MPB outbreak were significant in terms of the harvesting and production of pine wood products. We undertook a socio-economic impact assessment of the MPB on the southern interior region of the province, which documented the major socio-economic trends and reviewed the most probable socio-economic impacts that the MPB epidemic will have on southern interior communities; provided the SIBAC Board with objective professional advice on which southern interior subregions and communities are most at risk of experiencing negative economic impacts as a result of the MPB epidemic; and provided preliminary recommendations regarding options and next steps. The profile report was prepared for the Cranbrook TSA. We prepared similar reports for 10 other TSAs as well as the master report which met the objectives outlined above.

Integrating and Enhancing the BC Knowledge Transfer System

In association with Global CONNECT, we participated in a strategic review of the province’s knowledge transfer systems and university-industry collaboration. The resulting report describes the characteristics and best practices that are relevant to the province on the topics of collaboration and knowledge transfer mechanisms. The best practices are based on research, observations, and experience that the project team gained in conducting this review and from working relationships with leading innovative regions worldwide. In addition to BC, the regions specifically examined for this review are the Silicon Valley and San Diego in California; the Raleigh-Durham area of North Carolina (the location of the Research Triangle Park); St. Louis, Missouri; and Stockholm, Sweden.

Development of the Full-service Model for the Construction Industry Training Organization

The Industry Training Authority (ITA) with a mandate to expand and improve industry training, through the creation of a flexible, accountable and industry-led system. To this end, the ITA approved a series of Industry Training Organizations (ITOs), which are industry initiated and led organizations that are responsible for improving industry training in a specific sector. This project involved designing the largest of these organizations, the Construction Industry Training Organization.

Understanding the Labour Mobility of Tradespersons in the Asia Pacific Gateway

The primary objective of this project was to analyze factors that influence the movement of workers across sectors and regions. This research project examines the types and extent of labour mobility existent in British Columbia as well as the factors that influence it. Prior to the study, the determinants of labour mobility were not well understood. For example, it is not well understood how labour mobility is affected by factors such as demographics and other worker characteristics, personal motivations, ease of mobility, employer initiatives, transferable competencies, certification designation status, and national and provincial legislation. The project was undertaken in two phases. In Phase I, we conducted a preliminary literature review and exploratory interviews with a sample of selected experts to identify potential sources of background information and obtain preliminary input on key issues. We then conducted a workshop with the Steering Committee to obtain agreement on the key research questions to be addressed and the eight trades on which the study would focus. In Phase II, we implemented the research program and prepared this project report. The major components of the research included a review of past research, literature and other data, conducted interviews with 43 key informants (stakeholders and selected experts), surveyed 312 leading employers, surveyed 200 mobile workers, and conducted a series of six case studies to follow-up on common patterns of labour mobility.

Evaluation of Trade and Investment Activities

Western Economic Diversification (WD) plays a key role in promoting trade and investment. The purpose of this project was to conduct an evaluation of the department’s activities, covering the time period from 2007–08 to 2011–12. The first phase focused on the development of a Terms of Reference and a detailed evaluation work plan. The field research undertaken in the second phase of the project included a detailed document and literature review, project and database analyses, as well as interviews with 42 key informants, comprising WD management and staff and other federal, provincial, and regional government representatives. A client survey was conducted of 79 participants, comprising project recipients, project beneficiaries, project proponents that did not receive funding and organizations that did not apply for funding. Case studies were conducted of eight projects and focus group sessions were held in Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Edmonton and Vancouver, involving 37 participants.

Evaluation of the Western Economic Partnership Agreements

Western Economic Partnership Agreements (WEPAs) are a multi-year federal-provincial decision making tool designed to select projects that strengthen economic activity. Through individual agreements signed with each provincial government in western Canada, WD provided $25 million in funding for each of the western provinces, matched by the provincial governments, for a total investment of $200 million from 2008 to 2012. The purpose of this project was to conduct an evaluation of WEPA. The first phase focused on development of a detailed evaluation work plan. The field research undertaken in the second phase of the project included a detailed document and literature review, interviews with 143 key informants (including 25 WD representatives, 9 representatives of provincial governments involved in WEPA, 6 economic development experts, 15 other stakeholders, 4 representatives of other programs in Western Canada, 4 representatives of similar agreements in other regions, proponents of 50 projects, 19 representatives of spin-off projects, and 9 proponents of applications that did not receive funding), case studies of 8 projects (42 representatives were interviewed as part of the case studies), and focus group sessions in Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Edmonton and Vancouver involving 37 participants. The evaluation focused on two key components of WEPA: WEPA as a decision-making tool; and the economic development projects funded under WEPA using the Western Diversification Program (WDP) authority.

Evaluation of the WD Centenaries Program

The Centenaries Program was a one-time initiative commemorating the 100th anniversaries of the Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. The Government of Canada allocated a total of $100M for the Centennials. Western Economic Diversification Canada delivered $92M for capital legacy projects and Canadian Heritage delivered up to $8M for commemorative and celebratory events under their Celebration, Commemoration and Learning Program. The evaluation assessed the achievement of intended objectives and progress towards the ultimate outcome of increased economic activity and competitiveness in western Canadian communities. The evaluation methodology included document, literature, file and database reviews, a community survey, 29 key informant interviews and 6 case studies.

Evaluation of Mountain Pine Beetle Program

The Federal Mountain Pine Beetle Program comprised three key components delivered by different federal departments. Western Economic Diversification delivered the $56M communities component aimed at developing and diversifying the economies of affected communities. The $56M allotted to Western Economic Diversification was divided between the Community Economic Diversification Initiative ($36.6M) and the Airport Improvements Initiative ($19.4M). The Community Economic Diversification Initiative (CEDI) was a two-year contribution program addressing the long-term impacts of the mountain pine beetle on approximately 180 communities in interior British Columbia. The Airport Improvements Initiative (AII) was a two-year $19.4 million contribution program funding airport expansion projects in three communities affected by the mountain pine beetle: Prince George, Kamloops and Kelowna. Since these one-time initiatives will not be renewed, the evaluation focused on the initial, rather than ongoing, relevance of the initiatives. The evaluation methodology included document/literature review, file and database review, analysis of comparable programs, 49 key informant interviews, 118 project proponent interviews, nine case studies, an outcome assessment of comparator communities and two focus groups. The department delivered the Community Economic Diversification Initiative in partnership with 19 Community Futures Organizations and other community stakeholders.

ACOA Innovation and Commercialization Evaluation Report

The evaluation focuses on Innovation and Commercialization (IC) sub-program activities approved between 2005-2006 and 2012-2013. During this period, $652.5 million in ACOA assistance was approved for 1,131 IC projects through two grant and contribution programs: the Atlantic Innovation Fund (AIF) and the Business Development Program (BDP). The AIF focuses on increasing research, development and innovation in Atlantic Canada. The BDP is delivered regionally and has a broader scope, encompassing a variety of eligible activities that support the growth and competitiveness of SMEs. The evaluation employed multiple lines of evidence, including surveys of 277 IC clients, 16 case studies involving 52 projects, interviews with 60 key informants, a document and literature review, a review of project and operational data, the development of regional profiles and an economic impact analysis.

Evaluation of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Trade and Investment Program Sub-activity

The evaluation of ACOA’s Trade and Investment Program Sub-activities made use of multiple lines of evidence and qualitative and quantitative research methods. The research included interviews with 32 ACOA management and program staff, 11 representatives from other government departments, 26 other stakeholders/regional experts familiar with ACOA’s trade and investment programming, and 273 clients including 146 commercial trade clients, 54 non-commercial trade clients, and 21 non-commercial and commercial investment clients as well as 25 interns and 27 host organizations involved in the Export Internship for Trade Graduate (EITG) Program. We also conducted six focus groups involving 56 participants, 35 case studies (which were selected based on suggestions from ACOA staff as well as the results of interviews with clients and other key informants) and a review of documents and literature.

Evaluation of the Host Program

The objective of this evaluation was to provide an evidence-based and objective assessment of the relevance, implementation, and performance of the Host Program. We were engaged by Citizenship and Immigration Canada to prepare a detailed evaluation methodology report and to undertake a summative evaluation of the program. The evaluation focused on a series of evaluation issues and questions related to program relevance, design and implementation, program impact, potential alternatives, cost-effectiveness, and moderators and unexpected outcomes. The evaluation was designed to address the complexity of the three programs by evaluating the implementation and outcomes, taking multiple approaches and using multiple lines of evidence.

Evaluation of the Welcoming Communities Initiative

The objective of this evaluation was to provide an evidence-based and objective assessment of the relevance, implementation, and performance of the Welcoming Communities Initiative. We were engaged by Citizenship and Immigration Canada to prepare a detailed evaluation methodology report and to undertake a summative evaluation of the program. The evaluation focused on a series of evaluation issues and questions related to program relevance, design and implementation, program impact, potential alternatives, cost-effectiveness, and moderators and unexpected outcomes. The evaluation was designed to address the complexity of the three programs by evaluating the implementation and outcomes, taking multiple approaches and using multiple lines of evidence.

Evaluation of the Immigrant Settlement and Adaptation Program (ISAP)

The objective of this evaluation was to provide an evidence-based and objective assessment of the relevance, implementation, and performance of the ISAP Program. We were engaged by Citizenship and Immigration Canada to prepare a detailed evaluation methodology report and to undertake a summative evaluation of the program. The evaluation focused on a series of evaluation issues and questions related to program relevance, design and implementation, program impact, potential alternatives, cost-effectiveness, and moderators and unexpected outcomes. The evaluation was designed to address the complexity of the three programs by evaluating the implementation and outcomes, taking multiple approaches and using multiple lines of evidence.

Evaluation of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Innovation and Adaptation Programs

This evaluation examines the relevance and performance of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's (AAFC's) Innovation and Adaptation Programs: Canadian Agri-Science Clusters (Clusters), Developing Innovative Agri-Products (DIAP) and the national component of the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program (CAAP). AAFC has traditionally contributed to sector innovation through its research and development activities, knowledge transfer, and marketing of agricultural and agri-food products, processes and services. Through these programs, AAFC committed $120 million in funding to support innovation and adaptation in the pre-commercialization phase of the innovation continuum. The evaluation was based on multiple lines of evidence including a program administrative and operational data file review, a document review, a comparative literature review, key informant interviews, and case studies.

Evaluation of the Workplace Dispute Prevention and Resolution Program

This report presents a summary of the findings for the Summative Evaluation of the Workplace Dispute Prevention and Resolution program. For corporate reporting purposes the activities of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service (FMCS) are known as the Workplace Dispute Prevention and Resolution (WDPR) program. WDPR specific program activities include, but are not limited to, the appointment of mediation and conciliation officers to provide expert mediation and conciliation services to assist unions and employers in resolving collective bargaining disputes, as well as dispute prevention assistance in the form of training sessions, facilitation and grievance mediation. WDPR also conducts research and analysis to produce information and advice to the Minister of Labour on the management of high profile labour disputes affecting the public interest and on a range of industrial relations issues. This evaluation was conducted from August 2012 to September 2013 and covers the five‑year period between April 1, 2007 and March 31, 2012.

Evaluation of the Family Violence Initiative

The purpose of the evaluation was to examine the continued relevance of the Family Violence Initiative (FVI) undertaken by Justice Canada; its design and implementation; the accomplishments and achievements of activities implemented, from the perspective of immediate and intermediate outcomes; and the demonstrated efficiency and economy of the Initiative. The scope of the evaluation encompassed projects funded from 2005 to 2010 and policy activities undertaken from 2000 to 2010. Reflecting the range of activities and stakeholder groups involved in the Justice FVI, the evaluation methods included multiple lines of evidence including literature and legislation review; interviews with 33 key informants including Justice Canada employees, representatives from Justice FVI federal partners, provincial/territorial justice officials, and other stakeholders; a document review of funded projects, and six case studies.

Review of the Informal Conflict Management System

In 2006, the Department of Justice (Department) implemented the Informal Conflict Management System (ICMS) program, which is designed to prevent and resolve workplace conflict. The mission of ICMS is to achieve a workplace culture in which all staff, in all roles and at all levels, have the commitment, the skills and the resources to work collaboratively to seek early resolution of conflicts in a constructive and creative manner. ICMS focuses on both addressing systemic causes of conflict as well as individual instances of workplace conflict. This mission is facilitated by the core activities of the ICMS, including information sessions, conflict management training, service delivery, communications, and networking and partnering. This was a national evaluation of the ICMS that focused on the shorter-term results of the ICMS. The evaluation methodology included a survey of 276 Justice employees, interviews with key informants including senior management overseeing the program and 10 ICMS partners from a cross-section of units within the Department, a document review, a literature review, and interviews with seven representatives of similar ICMS programs in other federal government departments.

Federal Victims Strategy Evaluation

The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the continued relevance and performance (i.e. effectiveness, economy and efficiency) of key initiatives and activities under the Federal Victims Strategy from 2005-06 to 2009-10, with particular attention to the Victims Fund. The methodology used to evaluate the Federal Victims Strategy included a detailed document review and a review of relevant literature; interviews with 46 key informants, a file review of 57 Victims Fund funded projects, and case studies of 11 Victims Fund projects which included 18 interviews and an in-depth review of project documents, websites and other products.

Summative Evaluation of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program

The evaluation was undertaken in two phases. The purpose of the first phase was to complete a detailed work plan which was then implemented in the second phase of the project. Key components of the research included a detailed document review and review of program reports; field visits to 8 communities located in 7 provinces and territories to undertake job shadowing of Aboriginal courtworkers and to meet with various stakeholders; interviews and an online survey of 99 Aboriginal courtworkers; interviews with a sample of 93 judicial and court officials including 21 judges, 11 judiciary assistants, 22 crown lawyers, 24 defense/Legal Aid lawyers, and 15 others; interviews with 28 representatives from the delivery partner organizations including Justice Canada, provincial and territorial government partners, and SDAs; and interviews with 34 stakeholder representatives including representatives from 18 Aboriginal justice initiatives and 16 other community stakeholders.

Summative Evaluation of the Labour Management Partnerships Program

The Labour-Management Partnerships Program (LMPP) is designed to encourage effective labour-management relations in the workplace and at the sectoral level by providing funding assistance for joint projects by unions and employers that explore new ways of working, and of working together. The main purpose of the evaluation was to assess the results and effectiveness of the LMPP in achieving its outcomes and impact. An extensive field research program was undertaken which included a detailed document and file review, a review of the administrative registry/Common System for Grants and Contributions, and surveys of 27 key informants, 64 case study participants (including senior representatives of union and management), proponents of 10 rejected and withdrawn proposals, and a survey of 40 non participants.

Summative Evaluation of the Vancouver Agreement

The role of Western Economic Diversification Canada is to coordinate the involvement of several federal government departments in the Vancouver Agreement. The evaluation included multiple evaluation methodologies including key informant interviews, case studies, document and file review and a comparative analysis of similar initiatives. The evaluation data collected from the different evaluation methodologies was analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques.

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